Detailed math and considerations behind the Silver Safety Calculation

(For those who have a head for this kind of thing)


Note that in the formulas below, the "x" symbol indicates "multiplied by."


The formula is:

12 x pounds ÷ ppm = drops

What that says in plain English is the following:

12, multiplied by the number of pounds of body weight of the person, divided by the ppm of the product, equals the number of drops of the product that it is safe for the person to take per day—because it will result in an amount of silver intake that is equal to about 25% of the amount of silver the EPA suggests as the safety guideline (RfD) for the upper limit of daily silver intake.

Note: In converting drops to teaspoons and fluid ounces, use the following conversions:

1 teaspoon = approximately 100 drops (actually, about 105 drops)

1 ounce = approximately 600 drops (actually, about 630 drops), or 6 teaspoons

The Silver Safety Calculation can be applied to the ingestion of any product that contains silver, regardless of whether it is commercially produced or made at home and regardless of whether the product is called ionic or colloidal or nano or anything else. (Note that we strongly advise against homemade silver products unless very diligent steps are taken to determine the ppm of silver in the product being produced. Note, too, that it is not always sufficient to rely on a manufacturer's labeling claims with respect to the ppm of silver in the product. Prudence is advised.)

It maintains that a basic rule of thumb that's probably more than safe is that if your daily intake of silver from a dietary supplement is less than about 25% of the silver that the EPA recommends as safe for daily oral ingestion of silver, you're probably fine. This is like saying that if the EPA's suggested limits on silver concentration in drinking water are exactly met, and a person drinks a liter of water per 77 pounds of body weight, obtaining the equivalent of 25% of that much silver with a dietary supplement will result in about the same amount of silver as their drinking an additional 25% of a liter of their water per 77 pounds of body weight.

All things considered, the Silver Safety Calculation should obviously be a very reliable safety guideline.


Details:

To calculate how much that would be, here are some general mathematical guidelines:

The EPA Reference Dose ("RfD"), the recommended safe daily intake limit of silver from all sources, is:

0.005 milligrams ("mg"), which is 5 micrograms ("mcg"), per kilogram (which is about 2.2 pounds) of body weight.

That translates into saying the RfD is about 2.27 mcg per pound of body weight per day.

To target no more than 25% of that, you'd want your silver intake from dietary supplements to consist of no more than 0.5675 mcg of silver per pound of body weight per day.

To calculate that is a bit more tricky.

We'll start by assuming that a drop of water-based ionic silver complex or colloidal silver from a typical dropper contains approximately 0.04683 grams of water* at room temperature based on what we know. (This converts to about 21.3583 drops per gram, and assumes a cc is equal to a gram, which is true to within two-tenths of one percent at room temperature.) Translating that into silver concentration, we have the following:

A drop of a 1-ppm silver product from a dropper contains roughly about 0.04683 mcg of silver.

A drop of a 10-ppm silver product from a dropper contains roughly about 0.4683 mcg of silver.

A drop of a 100-ppm silver product from a dropper contains roughly about 4.683 mcg of silver.

Thus, the silver content of a drop of any given silver product from an eye dropper is roughly about:

ppm x 0.04683

where ppm is the silver concentration, in parts per million, of the given silver product.

(How much silver may be contained in a spray depends on the particular dispenser. A reasonable assumption is that a spray may contain on average the equivalent of roughly about three drops.)

A teaspoon may contain about anywhere from 80 to 100 drops, depending on the reference source you use. For our calculation purposes, we'll call it 100 drops to be conservative (to end up consuming less silver).

With that information, we can now calculate how much it takes to be within 25% of the RfD.

The formula for the calculation to determine how many drops per day is within the Silver Safety Calculation is:

(pounds of body weight x 0.5675) ÷ (ppm v 0.04683)

which can also be represented as:

(pounds of body weight ÷ ppm) • (0.5675 ÷ 0.04683)

or, in a simpler fashion, as:

pounds of body weight ÷ ppm x 12.1183 = safe number of drops per day

or, as:

12.1183 x pounds ÷ ppm = drops

or, rounding it off (to within about 1%) for further simplification, we have the final 12-for-25™ formula of:

12 x pounds ÷ ppm = drops

which is the same as saying:

12 multiplied by pounds of body weight divided by ppm of the product equals the number of drops of the product that can be taken per day that will comprise an amount of silver that's less than 25% of the RfD (EPA recommended safe daily limit of silver from all sources).

For example, say a person weighing 180 pounds has a silver product that has a silver concentration of 20 parts per million, and they want to know how much of the particular product they can take per day that would comprise an amount of silver that's less than 25% of the RfD suggested daily limit of silver from all sources. The math they would perform is as follows:

25% of the RfD for their body weight is "180 pounds multiplied by 0.5675 mcg" which equals 102.15 mcg. That's the total quantity of silver they're going to target as a daily intake limit.

The amount of silver in a drop of their 20-ppm silver is "20 multiplied by 0.04683 mcg" which is 0.9366 mcg.

Then, "102.15 mcg (total silver target) divided by 0.9366 mcg (amount in a drop)" tells them that about 109 drops is how many drops of their 20-ppm product they want to limit themselves to per day since that will comprise an amount of silver that's less than 25% of the RfD.

So, the formula would be:

(180 x 0.5675) ÷ (20 x 0.04683) = 109 drops

The simpler way of reaching the same figure (within about 1%) is using the 12-for-25™ formula:

12 x pounds ÷ ppm = drops

which is:

12 x 180 ÷ 20 = 108 drops

(If we look at the average conversion to teaspoons, roughly one teaspoonful should be a reliably safe amount.)

As a second example, say a 210-pound person has a 100-ppm silver product.

The long form of the math would be:

(210 x 0.5675) ÷ (100 x 0.04683) = 25.45 drops

The simpler way of reaching the same figure (within about 1%), using the "12-for-25™" formula, is:

12 x pounds ÷ ppm = drops

which is:

12 x 210 ÷ 100 = 25.2 drops

The Silver Safety Calculation should keep just about everyone within very safe limits for ongoing daily use of any silver product.

Just remember that the government's RfD is based on a lifetime of consumption, so it stands to reason that most people have plenty of room for making up the difference. It takes a lot of silver to cause argyria. That's why so few people have ever developed it, even with the irresponsible claims made by the manufacturers of some silver products, with the existence of silver in our food and water supply, and with perhaps millions of people having used silver products.


* Note that the exact volume of a drop of liquid will vary, depending on the viscosity of the liquid, shape of the dropper, speed, temperature, and so forth. The figures shown are based on an estimated volume of 0.04683 mcg per drop of the given silver supplement (which is assumed to be water-based).